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Glo teacher Alex Artymiak on overcoming a crisis

It’s midway through 2011 and I’m having one of the toughest years of my life. Struggling through a vocation modification, the end of a long-term relationship, a demise in the family, and a world trouble, I had sink into a penetrating feeling with no end in sight.

My name is Alex Artymiak, and if I could go tell myself one thing at the time, it would be “crisis precipitates growth, ” for 2011 would also be one of the greatest years of my life, its first year I immersed myself in yoga.

I began my yoga practice as a mode to cross-train my organization for surfing but soon experienced the incredible consequences that yoga has on the heart-mind, as well as the body.

With each class, I structured deeper connections with my torso and began to notice how know-hows off the matted would affect my force. The more centered I became, the more sensitive to the world I felt. Life became more moving and dynamic than ever before and I sought to discover how this was happening.

My advice is to first see yoga as a practice of the nervous system that affects the physical body.

I embraced these best practices of eastern philosophy as well as the technical approach of the west to understand and authorize its own experience I had. I began to see how my perceptions of the world affected my vigour, and how my vigor colored my thoughts and actions, which then reinforced my insights. I was stuck in a loop-the-loop that I had created unknowingly.

When we recognize security threats, our nervous system leads intensity to the survival of imminent possibility, elevating blood pressure and spate the body with hormones to fight or abscond. The brain switches to instinctive actions and reflexes and focuses solely on the problem at hand. This same biological response happens whether we are in physical possibility or are worried about finances, affinities, or world events.

When we escape physical threat, our nervous system relaxes and we become allay, nonetheless, when we are absorbed in the problems of our life, the nervous system stays in fight or flight and we experience chronic stress. We live in a state of constant dread and suspicion from a possible threat that are likely never actually happen, starting us to live in reactivity rather than creativity. The sensitivity to observe our district of being and the ability to calm our nervous system down when appropriate is a life-changing gift of yoga.

In the yoga sutras, “ishvara pranidhana” translates to “surrender to a higher power.” When we think of a higher power, we generally think of something outside ourselves but reviewed and considered the incredible dominance inside you that appointed an part human body from nothing more than two microscopic cells. This gentle ability occurs and sustains our forms without any self-conscious authority and steers us through our suspicion when we are open and receptive.

My advice is to first read yoga as business practices of the nervous system that affects the physical body. It is a conversation of telling the body to move into a figure or transition while listening to the hotshots that arise. As you become more sensitive physically, you become more sensitive to feelings and force. When you can notice the moment you are shifting into fight or flight, you can course-correct by relaxing strain in their own bodies and by slowing down the breath. Under stress, we verify merely problems, and when we surrender, we witness opportunity and potential.

Crisis triggers evolution. It am hopeful that whatever challenges you face in life, you resolve to connect deeper to yourself. When we surrender to the potent cordial intellect that exists within, we receive penetrations and apprehensions that can guide us to overcome any crisis and live a life of joy and objective. I look forward to connecting with you soon!

Inspired to take a class with Alex? Find his latest traditions here .

Read more: blog.glo.com

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Written by WHS

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